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COVID-19 Communication – lessons learned

COVID-19 Communication – lessons learned

Be prepared! COVID-19 has exposed all the vulnerabilities in our systems of society, of government, and of technology. We were complacent in our reliability on technologies that were new and groundbreaking at some point in the past, but no longer adequate.  Complacent in our absolute reliability of the government, at all levels to have been prepared for the inevitable. Essential workers performed spectacularly, it was the system that failed at many levels. Preparedness and adaptability are essential, and critical to maintaining the infrastructures necessary to preserve the American way of life. That may sound hyperbolic, but take a look around and ask yourself, “How did we get here?”

As we went into lockdown, in an uncertain future, we reevaluated and took stock of the industries we served.  Businesses shuttered and people distanced, but, front-line industries could not do the same.  They needed to remain in close contact and needed the support and equipment to do it. Electronic communication became a necessity. Evaluating how to operate in 24/7 health emergency conditions became a reality.  Supplying these lifesaving and business-saving equipment we took stock of how we operate and will operate in the future.

Shutdowns, riots, increased violence across our region and country, and hospital capacity being brought to the brink everywhere, have reinforced that we need to keep providing lifesaving equipment to the people on the front lines. Reliable communication to the people and apparatus that can help you do your job, and help keep you, and the people you are charged to protect safe, is absolutely necessary.  Advancing technology and the willingness to embrace this have provided the tools that will make your job easier and safer. 

Electronic communication has taken on a greater role in the daily routine of all industries. Communication equipment allows for a network of communication that enables an organization to respond to the needs of the people they serve. Products and services should be tailored to fit the needs of the particular organization.  A policeman needs a different communication device than a utility worker, or a healthcare provider, and all of this needs to be engineered by professionals. 

People have become complacent in the age of the smart phone.  Seemingly everything can be done on your phone these days.  In many respects this is a true statement, but setting up a network of communication to connect teams and departments is a much more nuanced and difficult proposition than one would think.  Apps are utilized, but are paired with physical equipment that is on a triggers edge in the face of emergencies. 

COVID-19 has unfortunately taught us many painful lessons. Smart organizations and governments need to adapt in the face of life altering emergencies. Being prepared will make communities feel at ease knowing the people charged with their health and safety are professionally trained and equipped with the tools necessary to save lives.  We can’t afford to let our guard down, we must be proactive and remember that in an emergency, it’s about the man next to you. Now ask yourself, “How do we never let this happen again?”

Since 1976, Tri-County Communications has offered hi-tech and affordable communication solutions using two-way, paging, and wireless data. Utility companies, municipalities, emergency management departments and others have come to rely on Tri-County to maintain the communication infrastructures that are critical for the delivery of life support services. Emergency Service Squads depend on us to supply and service their radio communications gear. Government agencies, schools and businesses across the United States have turned to our expertise for effective and affordable wireless solutions. Call us for a free consultation at 607.432.1125 or visit our website: www.tricountycom.com

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